BirdsEye Bird Finding Guide is now available for Android devices

BirdsEye Bird Finding Guide Launches for Android devices

BirdsEye Bird Finding Guide, the only full-featured bird finding app for smartphones, is now available for Android phones and tablets.

November 18, 2014, Pasadena CA – Birds in the Hand, LLC is proud to announce the release today of BirdsEye Bird Finding Guide for Android.

Launching with the same features that have made BirdsEye a hit on the iPhone, BirdsEye for Android will be available as a free download with various optional in-app regional purchase options covering all of the species of bird species in the world. All 1,140 North American species (including Hawaii) costs just $2.99 per month.

BirdsEye is a unique and indispensable tool for birders planning a birding trip, either a short walk in town or a multi-week trip across the globe. The real power of BirdsEye lies in the fact that it can be personalized to show a short list of target birds likely to be of interest to the user based on their life list. Users can track their list for any state/province, country or even county for their life or the current year.

“We built BirdsEye to support our mission: to promote citizen science through worthy projects like the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s eBird Project. BirdsEye for Android is especially important because it will help us reaching younger birders and birders in countries where Android is the dominant platform. It’s exciting to finally see BirdsEye, which is really a labor of love, available to so many more people worldwide” said Dr. David Bell, President of Birds in the Hand.

“The surprising thing to me about BirdsEye is how frequently it is used. Typical users open BirdsEye several times a week, making BirdsEye one of the most frequently-used apps on our users’ phones. That tells me that we are meeting an important need among both serious and novice birders” says Drew Weber, VP of Operations.

In addition to helping birders find birds, BirdsEye also offers sound packages for over 4,300 species of birds from BirdSounds.nl, a leading publisher of birding and nature sound packages. These sound packages offer extensive coverage of several areas of Central and South America, Australia, Asia, Western Europe and more. Many additional content packages are in the works.

BirdsEye for iPhone has been featured in the New York Times (http://goo.gl/rLIMXk), Scientific American, Birding Magazine (http://goo.gl/PKVOjR), numerous blogs such as this video blog on digiscoping (http://goo.gl/7SyMHj).

The Android app runs on all phones and tablets with Android 4.1 and higher. More details can be found at:http://birdseyebirding.com/birdseye-android

Download on Google Play

Birds in the Hand, LLC is a mission-driven organization based in Pasadena, CA is a leading producer of apps for birders and other nature enthusiasts. Birds in the Hand has created over 40 birding and nature apps for birders since its founding in 2009. In addition to the BirdsEye apps, Birds in the Hand also partnered with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to produce The Merlin Bird ID App, the most downloaded birding app this year; and the BirdLog family of apps which account for a large fraction of the data flowing into eBird.org.

Delaware: A Twitcher’s Playground

I had just gotten back to Newark, DE after a 500-mile marathon drive from Charlotte, NC. I was on the downside of a 5-hour energy and the audiobook voices of Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow were running rampant through my head.

Staggering into my room to lay down and rest my frazzled bum, I heard my housemate Taj Schottland screaming from down the hallway. Oh no, I thought.

Was there a rodent loose in the basement? Were there scantily clad babes at the door?

No and…no.

Instead, Taj alerted me that there was a King Eider in southern Delaware at the Mispillion River Inlet. Bzoink. My first reaction was NO. I WON’T. My second, involuntary brain calculation ran as follows a.) King Eider = state bird b.) must go now.

An 1.5 hour later we were standing on the deck of the Dupont Nature Center overlooking the Mispillion River flow into Delaware Bay. After moments of bird-less anxiety, we leaped into the air as a young male eider swam out from its sandbar recluse. The bird was visible for only ten seconds before it swam behind a wall of phragmites. Check out Tim Schreckengost’s account of this bird by clicking here.

Mission accomplished. Delaware year bird #260.

After the momentary elation, a tiny pang of guilt hit us. The come down. 1.5 hours of driving to watch a bird for ten seconds, only to turn around again? What’s wrong with us??

To solve this moral quandary, we drove another thirty minutes south to meet up with Tim Schreckengost and Ben Zyla at the Dogfish Head Brewery in Rehoboth.

What’s the moral of the King Eider Story? The moral is that in Delaware, even after 5 p.m., you can drive to the other end of the state, get a state bird and a couple beers, and get home by 9 p.m.

Okay, now let’s rewind a few months, back when I didn’t care about state and county lists.

That’s the attitude I brought with me when I moved to Delaware for graduate school in January. Although I’m a very serious birder, it took me a month to drive five minutes to see the 1st state record Anna’s Hummingbird. At the same time, I turned a blind eye to countless other nearby vagrants, whether it was a woodstar, fieldfare, or godwit. Rather than mooch off others discoveries, I’d always found greater thrill in the search for the unfound… or… maybe I just saw it as a waste of gas and time.

Then why did I drive down for a King Eider? A bird I’ve seen a bunch of?

Things change.

How?

You just have to move to Delaware. If, for whatever sadistic reason, you wanted to convert a sane person into a twitching lister, just tell them to pack their bags and move to The First State.

For state and county lists, nowhere is the playing field more level, the terrain more accessible. 3 counties. 1 state.  90 miles north to south, 30 miles east to west. Hilly and deciduous in the north, flat as a pancake marsh, pine, and agriculture to the south. It’s that simple. Highest elevation? A paltry 450 feet. There is nothing standing between you and running circles around this state.

Newark Reservoir, one of my new favorite haunts in Delaware. Best bird at the reservoir so far this year? Red-necked Phalarope.

It doesn’t hurt that packed within Delaware’s 2,500 square miles are some of the premier birding hotspots on the east coast, including Delaware Bay, Bombay Hook and Prime Hook NWR. The tiny state boasts around 405 recorded species, including mega rarities like Whiskered Tern, White-winged Tern (three at one time) and European Golden-Plover.

I’ve now lived in Delaware eight months, and have become a compulsive state lister. Whereas I still scoff at breaking it down to counties, I’m not sure about anything anymore. I’m obsessed.

Anyways, I’d tell you more but I’ve got to go… I need to add Black Tern to my fledgling state list. And yes, I’m willing to mooch.

More stories to come.

Marcellus Research Press!

For the past two summers, I have assisted with graduate research concerning Marcellus Shale development and its impact on breeding forest birds in Pennsylvania. Penn State News recently did on piece on Lillie Langlois, my delightful boss and the head researcher of the project.  Below is a link to the article. There is even a short video about some of our work embedded on the article webpage (because videos are awesome, right?). Enjoy!

http://news.psu.edu/story/282350/2013/07/22/research/grad-researcher-studies-impacts-marcellus-shale-development

A transport line for shale gas – photo by Lillie Langlois

4th of July Birding Challenge!

Do you love America? Are you a warm-blooded patriot looking for a way to enjoy your freedoms? Do you love birds? If you answered yes to one or all of these questions, then you qualify for the –

“Thermal Birding 4th of July Birding Challenge: ‘Merica Addition!”

American Avocet – photo by Steve Brenner

One week from today, people all across the country will be having cookouts, launching fireworks, and birdwatching! The rules of the challenge are simple: when you are out birding on the 4th of July, every species you see that begins with the word “American” counts. Also, any species that begins with the name of a U.S. state (e.g.. California Towhee) also counts. You can also collect bonus birds for each of the following winged-countrymen you spot: Bald Eagle, Wild Turkey, and the official birds of each U.S. state. So, for example, let’s say I go out on Independence Day and see an American Robin, 5 American Crows, 3 American Redstarts, a Louisiana Waterthrush, a Bald Eagle, and a pair of Eastern Bluebirds, then I would have a grand total of 6 countable species. So it’s fairly straight-forward and similar to other ‘big day’ type competitions. Feeling patriotic yet?

As with all birding competitions, this is solely meant for the purposes of fun, and as long as you have a good time birding, that’s what really matters. Also, mid-summer can be a very slow time for bird watching, so this provides an excellent opportunity for birders to get out there and check out some breeding birds in your area or scour those neglected local hotspots. Please post replies on how you faired with the challenge, and try to nab as many of these species as you can. Remember, Thomas Jefferson may have spent all day inside on July 4th, 1776, but that doesn’t mean you should! So get out there and bird, people . . . USA, USA, USA!

Here is the list of the 57 eligible ‘4th of July birds’ for counting in the ABA area, including the official birds of each state. (Note: ‘state game birds’ have been omitted, as has Hawaiian Goose, Blue Hen Chicken, and Rhode Island Red Chicken).

  1. American Avocet
  2. American Bittern
  3. American Black Duck
  4. American Coot
  5. American Crow
  6. American Dipper
  7. American Flamingo
  8. American Golden-Plover
  9. American Goldfinch (also state bird for IA, NJ, and WA)
  10. American Kestrel

    ‘Merica Kestrel – photo by Steve Brenner

  11. American Oystercatcher
  12. American Pipit
  13. American Redstart
  14. American Robin (also state bird for CT, MI, and WI)
  15. American Three-toed Woodpecker
  16. American Tree Sparrow
  17. American White Pelican
  18. American Wigeon
  19. American Woodcock
  20. Arizona Woodpecker
  21. California Condor
  22. California Gnatcatcher
  23. California Quail (also state bird for CA)
  24. California Thrasher
  25. California Towhee
  26. California Gull (also state bird for UT)
  27. Carolina Chickadee
  28. Carolina Wren (also state bird for SC)

    Carolina Wren – photo by Steve Brenner

  29. Connecticut Warbler
  30. Florida Scrub Jay
  31. Kentucky Warbler
  32. Louisiana Waterthrush
  33. Mississippi Kite
  34. Tennessee Warbler
  35. Virginia Rail
  36. Bald Eagle
  37. Wild Turkey
  38. Northern Flicker (AL)
  39. Willow Ptarmigan (AK)
  40. Cactus Wren (AZ)
  41. Northern Mockingbird (AR, FL, MS, TN, and TX)
  42. Lark Bunting (CO)
  43. Brown Thrasher (GA)

    Brown Thrasher – photo by Steve Brenner

  44. Mountain Bluebird (ID, NV)
  45. Northern Cardinal (IL, IN, KY, NC, OH, VI, and WV)
  46. Western Meadowlark (KS, MT, NE, ND, OR, and WY)
  47. Brown Pelican (LA)
  48. Black-capped Chickadee (ME, MA)
  49. Baltimore Oriole (MD)
  50. Common Loon (MN)
  51. Eastern Bluebird (MO, NY)
  52. Purple Finch (NH)
  53. Greater Roadrunner (NM)
  54. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (OK)
  55. Ruffed Grouse (PA)
  56. Ring-necked Pheasant (SD)
  57. Hermit Thrush (VT)